IL divorce lawyerIf you are a parent who is considering divorce, you may have concerns about how financial issues and child custody concerns will be handled between the initial split and the conclusion of the divorce. Divorce cases, especially high asset divorces and those involving a high degree of conflict, can take several months or several years to resolve. You may be asking yourself, “How will I make ends meet without my spouse’s income during the divorce process?” or “How will parenting time and parental responsibilities be divided before the divorce is finalized?” One way to answer these questions is to petition the court for temporary relief orders.

Temporary Arrangements for Child Custody, Child Support, and Spousal Maintenance

A petition for temporary relief asks the court to issue temporary court orders regarding certain financial and child-related issues. You can ask for a temporary relief order at any time throughout the divorce process. The temporary relief may address issues related to:

  • Possession of the marital residence
  • Spousal maintenance (alimony)
  • The sale of marital property
  • Health insurance
  • Child custody
  • Child support

The directions contained in temporary orders only last until the divorce is finalized. These orders may be modified if a spouse experiences a “significant change in circumstances” that necessitates the modification. Temporary orders for child support and spousal maintenance have no impact on the final orders. It is very possible that the amount of child support or spousal maintenance awarded in the final judgment will differ from what was awarded in the temporary order. On the other hand, temporary child custody orders can influence the final decisions about the allocation of parental responsibilities and parenting time. This is because the court makes child custody decisions based on the best interests of the child. It is generally assumed that dramatically changing a child’s living situation only adds to his or her stress during divorce. Consequently, courts are inclined to consider the child’s living arrangements during the divorce when deciding post-divorce custody issues.

Determining the Amount of Temporary Support to Be Awarded

Temporary orders for spousal maintenance and child support can provide a spouse with financial relief before any final decisions about maintenance and support are settled. When determining the amount of temporary relief that a spouse receives, the court will consider the incomes, assets, and needs of each party as well as the needs of the children. The court will review the spouses’ financial affidavits and parenting time arrangement and evaluate financial documents such as pay stubs, tax returns, and bank statements to determine fair and reasonable temporary support arrangements.

Contact a Kane County Divorce Lawyer

If you would like to learn more about temporary relief during your divorce or you have other divorce-related concerns, contact Shaw Family Law, P.C. Call our office at 630-584-5550 and schedule a free consultation with one of our skilled St. Charles divorce attorneys today.

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IL divorce lawyerDomestic violence affects millions of men and women across the country and throughout Illinois. Leaving an abusive partner takes a great deal of courage, but many former victims feel that leaving their abuser was the best decision they ever made. If you are planning to leave your abusive spouse, you may feel uncertain and afraid. You may not know what your rights are under Illinois law or how you can protect yourself during the divorce process. Read on to learn about some of the steps you can take to protect yourself, your children, your property, and your future when divorcing someone who has abused you.

Protecting Yourself and Your Loved Ones From Further Abuse

Abusers often use physical violence and psychological manipulation to keep their victims under their control. When an abusive person learns that his or her spouse plans to file for divorce, his or her threatening and abusive behavior may escalate in an effort to maintain this control. An Emergency Order of Protection (EOP) is like a restraining order. It prohibits the abuser from coming within a certain distance from you, your children, your pets, your home, or your workplace. It can even force the abuser to move out of your shared home and require him or her to surrender any firearms. If the abuser violates any terms of the protection order, you can call the police and have him or her arrested. You can obtain an EOP based on your testimony alone and without your abuser’s knowledge. Getting a protection order is a crucial step in protecting yourself from further abuse and establishing an official record of your spouse’s abusive behavior.

Protecting Your Financial Future

If you have been the victim of mental, physical, sexual, or emotional abuse, it is very likely that you have also been a victim of financial abuse. One of the best steps you can take when preparing to divorce is to gather copies of important financial documents such as bank statements and tax returns. Take inventory of your valuable possessions or those that are important for personal or sentimental reasons as well. Recording information about your property will help ensure that your spouse cannot hide or destroy assets. It also is an important first step in preventing your spouse from lying about finances during divorce in an effort to sway the divorce settlement in his or her favor.

Contact a St. Charles Divorce Lawyer

Hiring an experienced attorney is highly recommended for anyone who has been a victim of abuse. Your attorney can help ensure that your rights are fully protected throughout the divorce process and that you receive the fair divorce settlement you deserve. At Shaw Family Law, we help victims with everything from protection orders to settlement negotiations to child custody concerns. Schedule a confidential consultation with a skilled Kane County divorce attorney today by calling 630-584-5550.

 

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IL divorce lawyerFor many divorcing individuals, their divorce case is the first time they are involved in an extensive legal proceeding. If you are getting divorced, you may have numerous questions about what you should expect. During the “discovery” step of the divorce process, the spouses’ attorneys gather information and documentation from the spouses. This information is used when negotiating divorce issues such as property division, spousal maintenance, and child custody. If your divorce case goes to trial, the information gathered during discovery becomes valuable evidence that will be used to argue your case during litigation. Depositions are one way that information is gathered during discovery.

What Happens During a Deposition?

A deposition is a formal question and answers session that takes place outside of the courtroom. The individuals present at a deposition typically include the spouses, their respective attorneys, and other professionals relevant to the case such as a Guardian Ad Litem. If you attend a divorce deposition, you will be placed under oath and then asked a series of questions aimed at gathering information about the facts of your divorce case. A court reporter will record all of the questions and answers. It is important to answer the questions carefully and truthfully. Anything you say during a deposition may be later used against you.

Tips to Keep in Mind During Your Deposition

It is essential that you are well-prepared for your deposition. The fewer surprises you encounter, the better. Your lawyer can help you understand what to expect and help you practice answering the questions you will likely be asked during the deposition. When you are asked a question, take your time and answer it thoughtfully. Do not volunteer additional information or offer answers that are mere speculation. Your own lawyer may also ask you questions during the deposition that are designed to help you share information that is beneficial to your case. It is important to remain calm and professional during a deposition. Your spouse and his or her lawyer may say things that make you upset. However, keeping your cool is the best way to ensure that you do not say something that damages your case.

Contact a St. Charles, Illinois Divorce Lawyer

The experienced Kane County divorce attorneys at Shaw Family Law, P.C. understand that a contentious divorce can be extremely overwhelming and stressful. That is why we are committed to offering dependable legal guidance throughout the divorce process. To learn more about how our attorneys can help you, call our office at 630-584-5550. Schedule a free, confidential initial consultation today.

 

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IL divorce lawyerAs part of your Illinois divorce process, you and your spouse will be asked to submit a financial affidavit that lists your assets and income. This financial data is vital to obtaining a fair divorce settlement. Asset division, child support, and spousal maintenance are all contingent on divorcing spouses’ financial circumstances. If a spouse omits income sources, underreports business revenue, hides assets, or otherwise falsifies data on his or her financial affidavit, decisions about these divorce issues will be based on inaccurate information. Furthermore, lying about finances during divorce is unlawful. A process called forensic accounting is often the best way to uncover the truth about a deceitful spouse’s finances during divorce.

What Do Forensic Accountants Do?

Forensic accounting refers to an investigation into a spouse’s property, income, debts, and expenses. The more complex a spouse’s financial portfolio, the more in-depth this investigation will need to be. A forensic accountant is a financial professional who has specialized auditing, accounting, and investigative skills. He or she will work closely with your divorce attorney to thoroughly examine your spouse’s finances and discover evidence of deceit. Tax returns, bank statements, credit card statements, business contracts, invoices, mortgage applications, and other documents can all provide clues about hidden assets.

Methods for Hiding Assets During an Illinois Divorce

There are many different ways that a spouse may lie about finances in order to manipulate the divorce settlement or judgment. Financial deception is often used in an attempt to pay less in child support or spousal support or keep the other spouse from receiving the property division settlement he or she deserves. A deceptive spouse may hide assets by not reporting the assets or transferring assets to an unknown bank account. Spouses may also transfer assets to friends, family members, or coworkers. The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) is also sometimes used as a hiding place for assets. By “accidentally” overpaying the IRS, the spouse essentially loans the IRS money that is then returned to him after the divorce is finalized. Spouses may also undervalue assets, report lower than actual business revenue, or exaggerate debts and expenses in an attempt to sway a divorce settlement in their favor.

Contact a Kane County Hidden Assets Lawyer

Whether your divorce case is resolved through lawyer-assisted negotiations or courtroom litigation, accurate and complete financial information from both parties is crucial. If you suspect that your spouse is hiding assets, underreporting income, or otherwise lying about his or her finances, you need a divorce attorney who can protect your rights and advocate on your behalf. Call Shaw Family Law, P.C. at 630-584-5550 today and schedule a consultation with a highly experienced St. Charles divorce attorney to learn how we can help you get the divorce settlement you deserve.

 

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IL divorce lawyerGetting a divorce, or dissolution of marriage as it is called in Illinois, is not reversible. Some married couples who are having relationship problems may know that they want some space apart, but they are unsure of whether or not divorce is the right choice. This is just one situation in which a legal separation may be beneficial. Couples who get a legal separation are still technically married so if they choose to reconcile, they will not be required to get remarried. If they do not decide to continue the marriage, divorce is still an option. Most importantly, legal separation offers married couples a way to address issues such as property division, allocation of parenting time and responsibility, and spousal maintenance without the finality of divorce.

Illinois Separation Process

It is important to note that there is a difference between a physical separation and a legal separation. A married couple is not legally separated until they are granted a separation through the court. In order to be granted a legal separation in Illinois, at least one of the spouses must have lived in the state for a minimum of 90 days and the spouses must be living apart. If a spouse wishes to file for separation, he or she will need to file a petition for legal separation and a summons with their county’s Circuit Court. The petition and summons is then served to the other spouse and a date for a hearing is set. If the spouses have already resolved issues such as the allocation of parental responsibilities, child support, division of assets, and spousal maintenance through a separation agreement, the judge will likely grant the separation after this initial hearing. If the parties have not reached an agreement about one or more of these issues, they may need to attend an additional hearing. The authority of Illinois courts to divide assets and liabilities during a separation is much more limited than it is during a divorce. The court can only include asset division in the order for legal separation if the spouses have reached an agreement regarding how their assets and debts should be divided.

Benefits of Legal Separation

There are many different reasons that a couple may choose to get a separation instead of a divorce. Some couples are simply not sure whether or not they are ready to divorce. Other spouses get a legal separation in lieu of a divorce because divorce is prohibited by their religious or cultural beliefs. A spouse may also choose to stay married and obtain a separation so that he or she can still receive benefits such as social security, health insurance, or pension benefits. A legal separation is an effective way for a married couple to separate their finances and resolve issues such as child custody without ending the marriage. If you are interested in learning more about the legal separation process in Illinois, contact an experienced divorce lawyer.

Contact an Illinois Family Law Attorney

Legal separation does not end a marriage. However, it does allow spouses to resolve issues including property division, child custody, spousal maintenance, and more. To discuss whether or not a legal separation is right for your unique situation, contact Shaw Family Law. Call our office today at 630-584-5550 and schedule a free, confidential consultation with a seasoned St. Charles divorce lawyer.

 

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